Parents Are Exposing Their Children To Chickenpox On Purpose Through "Chickenpox Parties", And Doctors Are Staunchly Against It

You sure have heard of a tea party, a masked party, a Halloween party and the likes, even if you have never attended one of them. But have you heard of a chickenpox party? Yes, you read that right. 

READ ALSO: Doctors Urge Parents Not To Underestimate Vaccination: 11-Month-Old Baby Got A Stroke After Being Infected With Chicken Pox By Non-Vaccinated Sibling

Parents Are Exposing Their Children To Chickenpox On Purpose Through "Chickenpox Parties", And Doctors Are Staunchly Against It

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Chickenpox is a very contagious infection. This disease causes itchy blisters to erupt all over the body and causes symptoms such as fatigue, headaches, and fever.

Before the varicella vaccine became available, it used to be one of the most common childhood infections, but thanks to science, fewer cases are reported now.

Parents Are Exposing Their Children To Chickenpox On Purpose Through "Chickenpox Parties", And Doctors Are Staunchly Against Itchickenpox

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Sufferers of chickenpox often get well a few weeks after contracting the disease, if they are given proper treatment. However, it has also been known to be very dangerous for babies, pregnant women and for people with weak immune systems.

One would assume that, since a vaccine is readily available, parents would do well to get their kids vaccinated. Sadly, this isn't always the case.

It has been shown that many parents expose their children to the virus on purpose, and doctors have warned sternly against this practice.

Parents Are Exposing Their Children To Chickenpox On Purpose Through "Chickenpox Parties", And Doctors Are Staunchly Against Itchickenpox

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Uninfected kids are made to mingle with infected kids by their parents in the so called chickenpox parties in order to build immunity. And it seems this horrible practice has become a thing.

These weird and dangerous parties are being organized via private Facebook groups, investigations reveal. Some parents even have to travel far distances to get to these parties.

KUSA 9News, a news station investigating the matter, showed a screenshot of a mother who claimed to have been hounded by various parents to share her daughter's chickenpox.

Some parents keep the kids in a tent so that the proximity can hasten up the spread. Experts, however, have made it clear that purposeful infection isn't the answer and that the vaccine is much safer.

READ ALSO: Boy Born With Life-Threatening Moles Covering Most Of His Body Continues To Thrive

Most parents want their kids to build immunity early because, as adolescents, the infection can be much worse. It occurs as ‘shingles’ in teenagers and adults, and has much more severe symptoms.

Despite the argument for ‘natural, lifelong immunity,’ a vaccine shot can provide very similar results without the drawbacks.

Parents Are Exposing Their Children To Chickenpox On Purpose Through "Chickenpox Parties", And Doctors Are Staunchly Against Itchicken pox

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There are complications which arise from the virus, such as pneumonia, a shot will prevent them from occurring. The virus also increases the risk of getting some bacterial infections.

Another benefit of the vaccine is that it ensures the safety of the community. Kids who are put through chickenpox parties may end up mingling with, and unknowingly endanger, the whole community.

The Colorado Department Of Health and Environment supports vaccines as well. In a tweet, they encouraged parents to talk to their doctors in order to be better informed about the benefits of the vaccine.

Social media users have debated the issue substantially, with some supporting it and others vehemently standing against it. Doctors and medical experts have, however, strongly advise against chickenpox parties. Parents should do well to take heed.

READ ALSO: Childhood Vaccines: Their Purpose, Possible Risks And Other Questions, Answered

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