Study Reveals The Best Age For A Child To Start Kindergarten

Family & Kids

As a parent, it's normal to feel like you have to do everything just right. You want to feed your child the right food, teach him the right things and of course, send her off to kindergarten at the right age. Well, as it turned out, what we thought, for a long time, was the right age to put our kids in kindergarten has been shown to be wrong, well, according to this study.

Researchers at Stanford University published a study that seemed to point to the fact that kids who started kindergarten at the age of 6 had much better self-control several years later than kids whose parents sent them to kindergarten at age 5.

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The researchers studied over 54,000 parents who provided data about their children at age 7 to 11. They discovered that the children who started kindergarten one year later than the average had 73 percent better outcomes in a test to determine their hyperactivity and inattention four years later.

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According to experts, having self-control and the ability to stay focused on a task is an indicator of learning and development success.

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The researchers also explained that these traits are not ones that children are born with, they are determined by the way they are parented. To help kids develop those traits, parents are encouraged to establish routines (and stick to them), model similar behaviour and maintain reliable relationships with others. Creative play and socialisation are also other ways kids learn self-regulation and control.

If you want to improve these skills before the child gets into kindergartens, the researchers advised that you can educate the kids at home or enrol them in a pre-K programme that focuses on improving social skills.

READ ALSO: Little Girl Waits For Big Brother To Come Off The School Bus. Then They Share A Special Hug

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Evidently, from these results, it sounds like holding our little ones back a year may actually be beneficial in the long run. This is good news for parents who are just not ready yet to send their little treasures off to school.

Source: Mom.me

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